The Science of Recovery – Recovery Management and the Future of Treatment

Dr.John Kelly

September 14th 8:30- 10:30am Ballroom

Abstract: The clinical course of addiction is often a chronic one characterized by several episodes of treatment and shorter periods of remission and relapse, before full sustained remission is achieved. Although the majority of individuals with substance use disorder achieve full sustained remission, it is noteworthy that it takes several years following the achievement of full sustained remission before the risk of meeting criteria for substance use disorder in the following year is no higher than the general population. This indicates that ongoing recovery monitoring and management over the long-term may be required to facilitate long-term recovery. This talk highlights the chronic course of substance use disorder and reviews the interventions and recovery support services that have shown to be helpful in mobilizing and supporting remission as well as the mechanisms of behavior change through which they work.

Learning Objectives: 1. Describe the clinical course of addiction based on clinical scientific findings
2. Name three emerging recovery support services intended to extend and support recovery
3. Understand the empirical basis for shifts in language and terminology in the addiction field.

Bio:

Dr. Kelly is the Elizabeth R. Spallin Associate Professor of Psychiatry in Addiction Medicine at Harvard Medical School-the first endowed professor in addiction medicine at Harvard. He is also the founder and Director of the Recovery Research Institute at the Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH), the Program Director of the Addiction Recovery Management Service (ARMS) and the Associate Director of the Center for Addiction Medicine at MGH. Dr. Kelly is a former President of the American Psychological Association (APA) Society of Addiction Psychology and is also a Fellow of the APA and a diplomate of the American Board of Professional Psychology. He has served as a consultant to U.S. federal agencies and non-Federal institutions, and foreign governments. His clinical and research work has focused on addiction treatment and the recovery process, mechanisms of behavior change, and in reducing stigma and discrimination among individuals suffering from addiction.