Recovery Capital: Modelling Person-centered Approaches

 

Jessica Cooksey

Date: September 7th 11:00 am to 3 pm Studio 413

Additional Speakers include:
-Louise Cooksey, Last Door Recovery Society
-Susan Hogarth, Westminster House
-Keir Macdonald, Lookout Society
-Plus Lived Experience Stories

 

Abstract

There is a growing recognition that there are many pathways of recovery. This presentation explores the barriers and facilitators to recovery capital. Using the concept of Recovery Capital – a biopsychosocial recovery presenters provide a lens to identify distinct areas that can be enhanced and barriers to be addressed in individuals’ recovery processes. Three distinct community services present person-centered approaches to strengthening recovery capital. Because recovery is a relatively understudied topic, this presentation highlights evidence-informed approaches that can engage with and support people in their goals recovery from complex mental health and substance use challenges and improved in quality of life.

Learning Objectives

  • Identify distinct recovery capital areas that can be enhanced and barriers to be addressed in individuals’ recovery processes
  • Identify evidence-informed approaches that can engage with and support people in their goals recovery from complex mental health and substance use challenges and improved in quality of life
  • Updated knowledge about the interventions that are most effective for promoting recovery among people with complex mental health and substance use challenges

References 

Anglin, M.D., Hser, Y.I., & Grella, C.E. (1997). Drug addiction and treatment careers among clients in the Drug Abuse Treatment Outcome Study (DATOS). Psychology of Addictive Behaviors, 11(4), 308-323.
Evans, A.C., Lamb. R. & White, W.L. (2013). The community as patient: Recovery-focused community mobilization in Philadelphia, 20052012. Alcoholism Treatment Quarterly, 31(4), 450-465
Friedner Wittman, Douglas Polcin, Dave Sheridan, (2017) “The architecture of recovery: two kinds of housing assistance for chronic homeless persons with substance use disorders”, Drugs and Alcohol Today, Vol. 17 Issue: 3, pp.157-167, https://doi.org/10.1108/DAT-12-2016-0032
Weston, S., Honor, S. & Best, D. (2017) A Tale of Two Towns: A Comparative Study Exploring the Possibilities and Pitfalls of Social Capital among People Seeking Recovery from Substance Misuse, Substance Use & Misuse, 53:3, 490-500, DOI: 10.1080/10826084.2017.1341925

 

Recovery Capital Conference of Canada
September 6th and 7th, 2018

Register for Recovery Capital Conference of Western Canada
PRESENTING SPONSORS AND EXHIBITORS
SUPPORTING SPONSORS AND EXHIBITORS
REFRESHMENT BREAK SPONSORS
ADDITIONAL EXHIBITORS
Together We Can John Volken Academy Inner Visions Recovery
Sage Counselling and Addiction Services Interior Chemical Dependancy All Cleared Pardons Narcotics Anonymous
Chopra Health Centre Western Addiction Forum Sunshine Coast Health Centre New West Recovery

Better Understanding Urine Drug Testing   

Date: September 7th 11 am to 3 pm Theatre Room

Abstract

Urine drug testing can be an important tool used in addictions treatment and LifeLabs conducts nearly all urine drug testing in BC.  We have many insights to share regarding common misconceptions about urine drug testing, various testing methodologies, and drug testing trends.

Learning Objectives

Attendees will learn the advantages and drawbacks of the point of care testing (testing strips) and lab-based testing.

Attendees will learn the utility of urine drug testing for addictions treatment.

Attendees will learn the difference between urine drug screening vs. confirmatory testing.

Attendees will gain a provincial perspective of urine drug testing trends – the rise and fall of different types of drugs” “Attendees will learn the advantages and drawbacks of point of care testing (testing strips) and lab-based testing.

Attendees will learn the utility of urine drug testing for addictions treatment.

Attendees will learn the difference between urine drug screening vs. confirmatory testing.

Attendees will gain a provincial perspective of urine drug testing trends – the rise and fall of different types of drugs.

Recovery Capital Conference of Canada
September 6th and 7th, 2018

Register for Recovery Capital Conference of Western Canada
PRESENTING SPONSORS AND EXHIBITORS
SUPPORTING SPONSORS AND EXHIBITORS
REFRESHMENT BREAK SPONSORS
ADDITIONAL EXHIBITORS
Together We Can John Volken Academy Inner Visions Recovery
Sage Counselling and Addiction Services Interior Chemical Dependancy All Cleared Pardons Narcotics Anonymous
Chopra Health Centre Western Addiction Forum Sunshine Coast Health Centre New West Recovery

Human Rights, Substance Dependence, and Workplace Accommodation

This presentation provides a human rights perspective on substance dependence in the workplace, and an overview of the Canadian Human Rights Commission’s new guide for employers to workplace accommodation.

Substance Dependence is a disability protected by human rights legislation that has many serious consequences—for individuals, families, communities—and also the workplace. When an employee is dependent on drugs or alcohol, employers have an obligation to accommodate and support their recovery and must balance this obligation with ensuring a safe workplace. The Canadian Human Rights Commission’s new guide to accommodation provides employers with step-by-step guidance on accommodating substance dependence in the workplace and ensuring a safe workplace for all. This presentation provides an overview of the guide.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Recovery in the workplace workshop speakers


Dr. Ray Baker BIO

Associate Clinical Professor, UBC.
Consultant Occupational Addiction Medicine.
National Recovery Advisory Committee – CCSA.

Recovery Oriented Workplace

Alcohol and Drug Policies, Accommodating the addicted/ recovering worker


Dr. Paul Sobey BIO

President of the Canadian Society of Addiction Medicine.  Lead physician and an Addiction Medicine Consultant for the Royal Columbian Hospital.

Medicated Assisted Recovery and the Workplace

Issues of prescribed impairing substances, opioids, cannabinoids, long term recovery and opioids in the workplace.


Dr. Paul Farnan BIO

Associate Clinical Professor UBC.
Past Executive Director Physician Health Program of BC.  Consultant Occupational Addiction Medicine.

Occupations Addiction Medicine Overview

Contingency management, medical monitoring and safe return to work., Diagnosis and recovery oriented treatment planning


Dr. William Lakey, Workplace Health and Safety, BC

Recovery though an Occupations Health Lens

 

 

 


John Beckett

Vice-president with the BC Maritime Employers Association,  Chair, Board of Directors, Public Interest WorkSafeBC

Addiction & Recovery in the Workplace as an Employer HR/Safety Leader.

 


Rebecca Gowan   BIO

Senior Policy Advisor, Human Rights Promotion Branch, Canadian Human Rights Commission

Human Rights, Substance Dependence, and Workplace Accommodation

A human rights perspective on substance dependence in the workplace, and an overview of the Canadian Human Rights Commission’s new guidelines


Neil Menard

Mayor of Merrit, IWA past Vice President

Panel Moderator, A Union Perspective,  how an effective jointly run, recovery oriented EFAP can function

 


Front-line Experience

Guests of Dr. Sobey, Dr. Baker, and Dr. Farnan with experience successfully implementing Recovery Systems in the Workplace. Guests will come from the nursing, airline, and other safety sensitive professions. Details on speakers are to be announced.

 

 

What is Recovery Capital

Research has shifted from the pathology and short-term addiction treatment modalities to include more focused attention to recovery.  Conference participants will learn those factors that seem to make people with substance use disorders more resilient.  These characteristics have been termed ‘Recovery Capital’, defined by Granfield and Cloud as “The breadth and depth of internal and external resources that can be drawn upon to initiate and sustain Recovery from alcohol and other drug problems”.

Recovery Capital is not a fixed value, it diminishes during active addiction and increases during sustained recovery.  Recovery Capital may be grouped in four categories – internal: human and physical; and external: social and cultural.

Recovery Capital interacts with problem severity to shape the intensity and duration of support needed to initiate and sustain recovery.  Re-evaluation of Recovery Capital during the recovery journey may be used to determine quality and even duration of successful sustained recovery from addiction.

Research has shown that difficulties arise when trying to introduce evidence based guidelines into routine practice when approaching one population in the continuum care (e.g. providing evidenced based guidelines to just physicians, and no one else). Change in practice is most effective when comprehensive approaches are taken at different levels of the continuum of care (e.g. physicians, outpatient agencies, inpatient agencies, first responders, policy makers, etc.)

 

“Substantial evidence suggests that to change behaviour is possible, but this change generally requires comprehensive approaches at different levels (doctor, team practice, hospital, wider environment), tailored to specific settings and target groups.”

From best evidence to best practice: effective implementation of change in patients’ care

Grol, Richard et al. The Lancet , Volume 362 , Issue 9391 , 1225 – 1230

 

the most promising strategy for sustained, substantive school improvement is developing the ability of school personnel to function as professional learning communities”.

DuFour, R. Eaker, R. Professional Learning Communities at Work – Best Practices for Enhancing Student Achievement, Solution Tree Press, 1998

 

Using the theory that in order to create change in best practices you must create a “professional learning community” at different levels of the continuum of care, we intend to gather individuals that participate at all levels of the continuum of care together and create a professional learning community to collectively implement systemic change in the addiction treatment field.

Prior to this idea taking shape there have been symposiums and conferences that gather specific fields of professionals together, such as psychologists, or physicians, or counsellors, never before has there been such a comprehensive effort to include delegates from the continuum of care in addiction treatment.

Register for the Recovery Capital Conference today!

 

The Portuguese Experience. New Approach to Drug Policy,

“Dr. João Goulão, Portugal

Room Main Ballroom September 7th 8:30 am

Director-General of The General-Directorate for Intervention on Addictive Behaviours and Dependencies (SICAD) in Lisbon, Portugal

Presentation Description

The Portuguese Experience. New Approach to Drug Policy, It’s more than just decriminalization

The aim is to provide to the audience the historical context that led Portugal to the decision of decriminalizing drug use and possession for use; an overview on the responses developed as a result of the 1999 National Strategy on Drugs, which included this proposal among many others (the development of a network of services for prevention, treatment, harm reduction and social reintegration of people with drug related problems). Some results of those policies will be presented.

To clarify some myths still present around the so-called “Portuguese Model”; better explain that using drugs is still forbidden and punished in Portugal under administrative procedures, although it’s no longer considered a crime.

 

Learning Objectives

  • To explain how a comprehensive set of policies was put in place in the last 16 years, and why it’s not possible to directly import models from other countries

 

Addiction and Trauma: Strengthening Young Adult Recovery

Dr. Claudia Black

Room: Main Ballroom September 7 3:30 pm to 5 pm

Presentation Description

Recognize relationship of emotional dysregulation to addictions, identify dynamics of developmental trauma, list eight core elements to a healthy treatment process.

Working with the young adult with addictive disorders most often also means working with co-occurring disorders of anxiety and depression. This presentation will focus on the dynamics of underlying trauma that fuel these disorders.  Recognizing not just blatant traumas, but addressing developmental trauma is significant in their treatment.   Claudia will conclude by addressing treatment protocol that recognizes the development needs of this age group that is different from their older counterparts.

Learning Objectives

  • Recognize relationship of emotional dysregulation to addictions
  • Identify dynamics of developmental trauma
  • List eight core elements to a healthy treatment process

Drugs: Breaking the Cycle

Dr. Neil McKeganey, Scotland

Director of the Centre for Substance Use Glasgow Scotland

ROOM Main Ballroom 3:20 – 5 pm

Presentation Description:

Drugs: Breaking the Cycle

Using “Recovery Capital” to change the dynamics of communication and influence, ensuring health and well-being are at the centre of policy and planning.

In this presentation I will outline relevant experience from the UK on establishing a focus on recovery and recovery capital within drug treatment policy and practice. The presentation will consider some of the obstacles to establishing a focus on recovery and recovery capital and considers the ways in which treatment practice may need to change to develop an enhanced focus upon recovery. The presentation will consider the contribution not only of professional treatment staff in realizing the goals of a recovery focused drug treatment system but also the importance of moving beyond a narrow focus on client and provider.

 

Learning Objectives

  • To form a clear understanding of the contribution of a recovery focus in drug treatment policy and provision.
  • To better understand the potential challenges to developing a recovery focus in drug treatment policy and provision.
  • To critically consider the roles and responsibilities that may attach to treatment provider and client within an expanded understanding of recovery work.

Teaching Non-Alcoholic Professionals the Language of Heart

ROOM: Studio 411, 10:50 to 12:30

Dr. George Vaillant, Psychiatrist and Professor at Harvard Medical School

An empirical 60 year follow up of how the 12 Steps of AA and group membership render AA the most effective treatment modality for drug addiction.

To understand the power of positive emotions and unconditional acceptance in AA groups

Learning Objectives:

  • To understand the importance of sustained AA attendance
  • To understand the principles of relapse prevention

What Is Recovery?

Elements that define recovery and the Science of Recovery systems.

Room – Studio 411 September 7, 1:30 to 3 pm

Dr. Jane Witbrodt, Alcohol Research Group, Associate Scientist, Formal and informal solutions to recovery from substance use disorders with emphasis on gender, racial/ethnic and cross-cultural differences.

Presentation Description:

Addictions medicine has long possessed reliable instruments for diagnosing substance abuse disorders. However, a way of measuring the opposite end of the problem spectrum – recovery – has been missing. The first large scale U.S. study provided an empirically-derived definition of recovery based on how it is experienced by those who actually live it. To uncover the definition of recovery, intensive qualitative and quantitative research was conducted, culminating in an online survey that was completed by 9,341 people experiencing different pathways to recovery. These pathways included treatment, 12-step groups, non-12-step groups, medication-assisted recovery, and natural recovery. The study identified 39 recovery elements that define recovery. These elements are grouped into five areas: abstinence in recovery, essentials of recovery, enriched recovery, spirituality of recovery, and uncommon elements of recovery. Results may be useful for reducing stigma and opening dialog about addiction, because the definition clearly demonstrates many positive “ways of being” that define recovery.

Learning objectives:

1) gain an understanding of the mixed research methods used (including use of a large scale online survey) to create a definition of recovery;

2) identify elements of recovery as described and lived by people in recovery across the U.S.; and

3) learn how the recovery elements can used by clinicians and other service providers to help clients prepare for a life in recovery, family members to help them understand what to expect when loved ones get into recovery, and others, in general, to reduce the stigma often associated with addiction.