Bridging Addiction and Mental Health Recovery

Speaker: Mary  Bartram PhD

September 14th 10:50am-12:30pm Clipper Room

Abstract: Recovery has long been a key concept in both the addiction and mental health sectors. But does the concept of recovery in addictions mean the same thing as in the mental health field? Recovery in both sectors has its roots in the advocacy of people with lived experience and their families, and includes a focus on hope in the face of stigma, self-determination, transformation, and the many dimensions of life (such as adequate housing, meanginul activities and connections, and freedom from discrimination). While there are differing opinions in the addiction field as to whether abstinence is in fact a necessary condition for recovery, cure is generally not thought to be necessary for mental health recovery. This presentation will explore the implications of these convergences and divergences for the development of a shared vision for addiction and mental health recovery

Learning Objectives: 1. To understand what the convergences between the recovery concept in the addiction and mental health sectors are, and how these convergences came about.
2. To understand where the recovery concept in the addiction and mental health sectors diverge, and why.
3. To explore – in both small and large group discussions – the implications of these convergences and divergences for the development of a shared vision for addiction and mental health recovery.

References: Davidson, L. & White, W. J (2007). The Concept of Recovery as an Organizing Principle for Integrating Mental Health and Addiction Services. Behav Health Serv Res (2007) 34: 109-120, https://doi.org/10.1007/s11414-007-9053-7
Mulvale, G. & Bartram, M. (2015). No More “Us” and “Them”: Integrating Recovery and Well-Being into a Conceptual Model for Mental Health Policy. Canadian Journal of Community Mental Health, 34:31-67, https://doi.org/10.7870/cjcmh-2015-010
McQuaid, R., Jesseman, R., & Rush, B.R. (in press). Examining Barriers as Risk Factors for Relapse: A Focus on the Canadian Treatment and Recovery System of Care. Canadian Journal on Addiction.
Jacobson, N., & Greenley, D. (2001). What Is Recovery? A Conceptual Model and Explication. Psychiatric Services, 52(4), 482–485. https://doi.org/10.1176/appi.ps.52.4.482

Bio:

Mary Bartram has extensive experience in mental health policy development with federal and territorial governments, indigenous organizations and NGOs, including as the Director, Mental Health Strategy with the Mental Health Commission of Canada. Mary has been working as an independent researcher and consulted since completing her PhD at the School of Public Policy and Administration at Carleton University in 2017. She is an RSW and holds an MSc in Family Therapy from Purdue University.

Mary’s doctoral researched focused on equity in access to psychotherapy in Canada, Australia and the UK, with a particular focus on financial barriers and how government structure shapes service system design. Her consulting work to date has focused on implementation of reforms to improve access to psychotherapy and mapping the connections between the substance use and mental health sectors. She is particularly interested on the role of human resources and metrics in ensuring meaningful implementation of the new $5billion federal transfer for mental health and addictions.

Addressing PTSD with Concurrent Substance Use Following Occupational Trauma

Dr. Hester Dunlap September 13th 1:30-3:00pm Clipper Room

Abstract:

It is common for PTSD and Substance Use Disorders to co-occur among individuals attending treatment for operational stress injuries. This presentation will discuss common presenting issues in the context of treatment following occupational trauma and the relationship between PTSD and Substance Use. The empirical literature examining recommended treatments for comorbid addiction and traumatic stress will be reviewed. Clinical considerations when addressing both in treatment will be discussed including stigma challenges specific to the respective conditions,  addressing safety, and optimizing relapse prevention.

Bio:

Dr. Dunlap is the Lead Psychologist in the Trauma and Psychological Injury Program at Bellwood Health Services. She provides residential treatment for Operational Stress Injuries among veterans and first responders. She is the former Clinic Head of the Work, Stress, and Health Program at the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health and has been providing assessment and treatment following occupational trauma for over 10 years. She has extensive experience working with stress related disorders including PTSD, depression, anxiety, substance use, and chronic pain.

Bio:

Dr. Dunlap is the Lead Psychologist in the Trauma and Psychological Injury Program at Bellwood Health Services. She provides residential treatment for Operational Stress Injuries among veterans and first responders. She is the former Clinic Head of the Work, Stress, and Health Program at the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health and has been providing assessment and treatment following occupational trauma for over 10 years. She has extensive experience working with stress related disorders including PTSD, depression, anxiety, substance use, and chronic pain.

New Guidelines for Alcohol Addiction for Youth (APA Strategy for Youth)

Arthur C. Evans Jr

September 14th  3:15-5:00pm Ballroom

Bio:

Policymaker, clinical/community psychologist, and health care innovator, Arthur C. Evans, Jr., Ph.D., is the CEO of the American Psychological Association.  He previously served for 12 years as Commissioner of Philadelphia’s Department of Behavioral Health and Intellectual disability Service.  The transformation of the Philadelphia service system has dramatically improved health care outcomes and saved millions of dollars that the city has reinvested in other community-based services.  Prior to this time, Dr. Evans developed a multi-disciplinary private practice in New Haven, Connecticut, where he also served in leadership positions in clinical administration and state government.

 

Dr. Evans has held faculty appointments at the University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine and the Yale University School of Medicine.

8 Tips for Leaders on How to deal with Mental Health in the Workplace

Christine Burych

September 14th 10:50am-12:30pm  Sky Room

Abstract:

New findings, new trends and new opportunities are shaping the leadership and business agenda for mental health in the workplace. These trends are gaining further traction as their impact on the workplace steadily increases. In 2013 the cost of mental health to the Canadian economy was estimated at $51 billion with 500,000 Canadians absent from work on any given week due to mental health issues, including stress and mental health disorders.

As an employer, what can you do to create an environment of success and support for your employees to minimize the stigma and long-term absenteeism that often result?

Objectives:

* increase your awareness of the impact that stigma has on leadership behaviours

* learn best practices on how to support and manage mental health issues in the workplace

* learn strategies on how to have a supportive and productive conversation when someone is struggling

Bio:

Christine Burych is a top tier leadership consultant and executive coach who enables leaders to create collaborative, productive and mentally healthy workplaces that everyone wants be part of. She has helped more than 8,000 senior leaders in 50 big name companies get past their blind spots, improve mental resilience and grow their leadership presence in the best possible ways.

Christine worked the rapidly expanding Porter Airlines to develop their employee commitment statement and roll out corporate social responsibility initiatives, multi-year leadership programs and crucially, an employee innovation strategy that gets ideas from the ground to executives. She helped Canada Post to shift their culture to a focus on psychological health and safety. She has also moved the needle for Jam3, PepsiCo, Bell Canada, Staples, Johnson & Johnson, Cochlear, Richardson and Gameloft.

The exceptional, impossible-to-miss results she consistently delivers are rooted in her diverse, twenty-five-year background. Christine started her working life as a front-line community mental health worker, advancing to Acting Vice President of Human Resources and Organizational Development at Canada’s largest teaching and research mental health facility. She has held senior positions in HR and OD, facilitated, taught, coached and led clients and families, community members, volunteers, employees and executives across various public and private sectors.

As a commitment to her leadership passion, Christine runs the Millennial Crusade, a pro-bono, year-long program to address the leadership gap for Gen Ys moving up faster than any other generation in the workplace. This grassroots movement supports over 200 members, including rising all-stars at North America’s largest companies.

Christine holds a master’s Degree in Human Resource Management and a BA in Psychology from York University. She is a Certified Professional Coach from the College of Executive Coaches in the US, is a certified mBIT coach (multiple brain integration techniques) and has completed certifications in various assessment tools.

 

Protecting Addicted Youth,

Angie Hamilton

September 13th 1:30-3:00pm Sky Room

Bio:

Angie Hamilton is a retired lawyer. She graduated from McGill University in 1984 with a Bachelor of Civil Law (B.C.L.) and a Bachelor of Laws (LL.B). After being called to the Ontario Bar in 1986 she practiced in the area of Tax and Estate Planning for 11 years at Goodman and Carr, LLP and then started her own practice in 1997. She retired from law in 2003 to devote more time to her family. She is a member or the National Board of MADD Canada and the Chair of MADD Canada’s Public Policy Committee. In 2016 Angie founded Families for Addiction Recovery (FAR) with other parents whose children have struggled with addiction from an early age. FAR is a Canadian registered charity.

Angie is also a member of the Community Dialogue Steering Committee established by Toronto Public Health as part of the Toronto Overdose Action Plan. The mandate of the committee is to develop a community dialogue process in Toronto on what a public health approach to drug policy should look like for Canada. Through lived experience with one of her son’s struggles with addiction, Angie has developed a passion for supporting other families struggling with addiction, compassion for those in active addiction and an immense respect for those living in recovery.

Recovery Support in Education: Recovery High Schools and Collegiate Recovery

Kristen Harper

September 13th 1:30-3:00pm Sky Room

Abstract: Adolescent and emergent adults in recovery from substance use disorder are confronted with the challenge of protecting their new way of life everyday campuses. Peer influences, academic pressure, and family stressors can often be too much for young people who are in the process from recovering from addiction. These recovery hostile environments can be a barrier to sustained recovery, often causing students to dropout or return to use within a very short period of time. Over the past thirty – five years, however, educators, therapists, peers, and families have come together to address this severe lack of services for youth seeking a supportive community of understanding. Recovery High Schools and Collegiate Recovery Programs provide developmentally appropriate safe and affirming environments that enable students to thrive in their educational and personal pursuits. This interactive presentation will provide conference attendees with a fresh perspective on youth recovery supports in educational settings as well as demonstrate how these programs impact communities at large. Participants will also be given a step by step process for creating recovery schools or collegiate recovery programs in their local communities.

Objectives:

(1) Understand continuum of recovery care services in secondary and post secondary settings, (2) Discuss community impact of recovery support services in secondary schools and institutions of higher education, (3) Review observations, patterns, and trends from various model recovery high schools and collegiate recovery programs across the U.S. and how these programs are replicable.

References: (n.d.). Retrieved March 15th, 2018, from http://www.collegiaterecovery.org/
Finch, A. J., & Karakos, H. L. (2014). Substance Abuse Recovery and Schooling: The Role of Recovery High Schools and Collegiate Recovery Communities. Peabody Journal of Education, 89(2), 159-164.
Fisher, E. A. (2014). Recovery Supports for Young People: What Do Existing Supports Reveal About the Recovery Environment? Peabody Journal of Education, 89(2), 258-270.
Harris, K. S., Baker, A. K., Kimball, T. G., & Shumway, S. T. (2008). Achieving Systems-Based Sustained Recovery: A Comprehensive Model for Collegiate Recovery Communities. Journal of Groups in Addiction & Recovery, 2(2-4), 220-237.
Kelly, J. F. (2003). Self-help for substance-use disorders: history, effectiveness, knowledge gaps, and research opportunities. Clinical Psychology Review, 23(5), 639-663.
Moos, R. H. (2008). Active ingredients of substance use-focused self-help groups. Addiction, 103(3), 387-396.
Selected Papers of William L. White. (n.d.). Retrieved April 09, 2018, from http://www.williamwhitepapers.com/
Smock, S. A., Baker, A. K., Harris, K. S., & D’sauza, C. (2011). The Role of Social Support in Collegiate Recovery Communities: A Review of the Literature. Alcoholism Treatment Quarterly, 29(1), 35-44.
Transforming Youth Recovery 2017 Census and Definitions of Recovery Support in Higher Education (n.d.) retrieved March 30th, 2018, from https://www.transformingyouthrecovery.org/research/2017-census-and-definitions-for-recovery-support-in-higher-education/.

Bio:

Kristen K. Harper, M.Ed., is currently partnering with Transforming Youth Recovery (TYR) to bring high quality technical assistance to collegiate recovery programs who have received one of TYR’s highly sought-after Seeds of Hope and Bridging the Gap grants. Prior to joining the TYR team, she was the Executive Director of Recovery Communities of North Carolina; a nonprofit, recovery community organization, devoted the promotion of addiction recovery, wellness and citizenship through advocacy, education and support. In 2013-2017, Kristen had the great fortune to be the first, full-time Executive Director for the Association of Recovery Schools (ARS), where she assisted in the creation, sustainability and accreditation of recovery high schools across the country. As the Collegiate Recovery Community Replication Coordinator for Texas Tech University’s Center for the Study of Addiction and Recovery from 2011-2013, Kristen provided technical assistance to over 80 universities seeking to create and manage collegiate recovery programs in all regions of the country. Kristen also founded the Center for Addiction Recovery at Georgia Southern University in 2008 within the College of Public Health, where she also became involved with Recovery Africa, a nongovernmental organization who strives to create recovery supports to communities in Africa. Kristen has been to Ghana, West Africa several times to provide technical assistance to the emerging recovery community. Kristen was invited and joined the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services National Advisory Council (CSAT) in 2016. As a person living in long-term recovery, Kristen has dedicated her life to helping others access recovery support services, locally, nationally and internationally.

 

Pain management and opiod addiction management

Dr. Jean-Pierre Chiasson

September 14th 1:30- 3:00pm Clipper Room

Bio:

Dr. Jean-Pierre Chiasson, an addiction specialist certified by the Canadian Society of Addiction Medicine and a Fellow of the American Society of Addiction Medicine.

* Doctorat en médecine de l’Université de Montréal, 1968.

* Certificat de l’American Society of Addiction Medicine (ASAM) (USA), 1988.

* Fellow de l’American Society of Addiction Medicine (ASAM) (USA), 1996.

* Fondateur en 1986 et, depuis, directeur médical de la Clinique Nouveau

* Départ (centre de traitement spécialisé en alcoolisme et autres toxicomanies).

* Certifié de la Société médicale canadienne sur l’addiction (SMCA), octobre 2001.

* Membre de la Société des médecins experts du Québec.

* MROCC: Certified Medical Review Officer (Medical Review Certification Council) (USA), décembre 1999.

 

Recovery Capital for Adolescents and Emerging Adults: Theoretical Considerations and Empirical Application

Emily Fisher – HOD, Peabody Research Institute – request of Deanna Meador. Photo by Joe Howell.

Dr. Emily Alden Hennessy, MPhil, PhD

September 13th 1:30- 3:00pm Sky Room

Abstract: Adolescent recovery from substance use disorders is a complex and dynamic process requiring multiple individual and contextual resources. Recovery capital is one theoretical framework that encompasses all these resources by incorporating four dimensions: financial, human, social, and community recovery capital. The theory of recovery capital was developed through a study of adults who achieved natural recovery and has since been used primarily in adult recovery-related literature. Thus, this presentation first discusses the primary components of recovery capital, with developmental adaptations specific to adolescents. Next, the presentation applies the recovery capital model to adolescents through two empirical studies. The first research study explores the recovery capital model among a national sample of adolescents from the United States who need treatment for a substance use disorder. This first study identifies five qualitatively distinct classes of recovery capital among this adolescent population, separated by financial resources, the types of social support received, and mental health ratings, among other factors. Additionally, adolescent characteristics including sex, race, age, and previous treatment history predicted the type of recovery capital class to which an adolescent belongs. The second study examines whether recovery capital resources predict attendance at one form of community recovery capital, a recovery high school (RHS) versus returning to a traditional school (e.g., public school). The results of this study indicate that predictors of RHS attendance are diverse and represent factors in multiple recovery capital domains. The strongest predictors of RHS attendance were individual-level factors such as problem solving orientation/skills, school attendance, and 12-Step frequency. Environmental factors including parent social position, substance-approving peers, and neighborhood social connection also predicted RHS attendance. The presentation will conclude with a discussion of how these findings impact future research and potential applications for practitioners who work with adolescents.

Objectives:

1. Audience members will be able to describe the different domains of recovery capital.
2. Audience members will be able describe how the recovery capital model could be applied to adolescents using a developmental lens and will be encouraged to consider factors not yet included in the model.
3. Audience members will be able to identify some characteristics that may be useful in assessing an adolescent’s recovery capital strengths and areas for additional support.

Bio: Emily A. Hennessy holds a PhD in Community Research and Action from Vanderbilt University with a quantitative methods minor and is currently a post-doctoral fellow at the Institute for Collaboration on Health, Intervention, and Policy (InCHIP) at the University of Connecticut. She has studied adolescent health promotion for the past 10 years and focused on adolescent recovery and recovery capital for her doctoral research. She has a number of presentations and publications from her research on adolescent substance use and recovery including a Campbell Collaboration funded systematic review of recovery high schools and collegiate recovery programs. Through her work with Dr. Finch, she was also involved in the first empirical study of the effectiveness of recovery high schools, a project that also involved visiting and interviewing recovery administrators and treatment staff at various adolescent treatment and recovery locations.

Bio:

Dr. Emily A. Hennessy holds a PhD in Community Research and Action from Vanderbilt University, graduating with the Founders Medal for highest honors, and with a quantitative methods minor. As a US-Norway Fulbright scholar, she has received a Master of Philosophy in Health Promotion from the University of Bergen. She is currently a post-doctoral fellow at the Institute for Collaboration on Health, Intervention, and Policy (InCHIP) at the University of Connecticut where she studies mechanisms of behavior change. Her focus for the past 10 years has broadly been on adolescent health promotion and she focused specifically on adolescent recovery and recovery capital for her doctoral research. She has a number of presentations and publications from her research on adolescent substance use and recovery including a Campbell Collaboration funded systematic review of recovery high schools and collegiate recovery programs.

Through her work with Dr. Andrew Finch, she was involved in the first empirical national US study of the effectiveness of recovery high schools. She is currently collaborating on a national study of secondary data analysis of collegiate recovery programs in the USA.

Bridging Addiction and Mental Health Recovery

Dr. Brian Rush PhD

September 14th 10:50am-12:30pm Clipper Room

Abstract: Recovery has long been a key concept in both the addiction and mental health sectors. But does the concept of recovery in addictions mean the same thing as in the mental health field? Recovery in both sectors has its roots in the advocacy of people with lived experience and their families, and includes a focus on hope in the face of stigma, self-determination, transformation, and the many dimensions of life (such as adequate housing, meanginul activities and connections, and freedom from discrimination). While there are differing opinions in the addiction field as to whether abstinence is in fact a necessary condition for recovery, cure is generally not thought to be necessary for mental health recovery. This presentation will explore the implications of these convergences and divergences for the development of a shared vision for addiction and mental health recovery

Objectives:

1. To understand what the convergences between the recovery concept in the addiction and mental health sectors are, and how these convergences came about.
2. To understand where the recovery concept in the addiction and mental health sectors diverge, and why.
3. To explore – in both small and large group discussions – the implications of these convergences and divergences for the development of a shared vision for addiction and mental health recovery.

References: Davidson, L. & White, W. J (2007). The Concept of Recovery as an Organizing Principle for Integrating Mental Health and Addiction Services. Behav Health Serv Res (2007) 34: 109-120, https://doi.org/10.1007/s11414-007-9053-7
Mulvale, G. & Bartram, M. (2015). No More “Us” and “Them”: Integrating Recovery and Well-Being into a Conceptual Model for Mental Health Policy. Canadian Journal of Community Mental Health, 34:31-67, https://doi.org/10.7870/cjcmh-2015-010
McQuaid, R., Jesseman, R., & Rush, B.R. (in press). Examining Barriers as Risk Factors for Relapse: A Focus on the Canadian Treatment and Recovery System of Care. Canadian Journal on Addiction.
Jacobson, N., & Greenley, D. (2001). What Is Recovery? A Conceptual Model and Explication. Psychiatric Services, 52(4), 482–485. https://doi.org/10.1176/appi.ps.52.4.482

Bio:

Brian worked for over 38 years as a substance use/mental health researcher with the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health (CAMH) and retired to focus on a private consulting practice in 2013. He retains an honorary appointment in CAMH as Scientist Emeritus and is a Full Professor at the University of Toronto in both the Departments of Psychiatry and Public Health Sciences where he is still very active in graduate student supervision.

His work spans population health, needs-based planning, and evaluations of mental health and addictions treatment programs and treatment systems. Brian has led major research syntheses concerning treatment interventions and service and sector-level integration and collaborative care; developed provincial and regional performance measurement frameworks, including process and outcome monitoring for alcohol and drug treatment; developed and validated evaluation tools and protocols including outcome monitoring measures and tools to assess client and family members’ satisfaction with services received, and the evaluation of implementation strategies vis-à-vis evidence-informed practice. He has conducted major system reviews in Ontario, Nova Scotia, British Columbia and, most recently, Manitoba – work which keeps him firmly grounded in the issues of the day and people’s lived experience with mental health and addiction challenges, including their experience accessing assistance services and supports.