Beyond Cannabis Legalization: Refocusing on Communities and Public Health

Beyond Cannabis Legalization: Refocusing on Communities and Public Health
Andrew Freedman, Colorado’s First Director of Marijuana

September 14th 1:30-3:00 pm Round Room

Abstract: Over the past decades, North America has been torn apart by diametrically opposed and deeply held beliefs about cannabis. To some it inspires love, medicates the sick, and promotes wellbeing. To others it is a limitless font of crime, addiction, and social unrest. Through the last half of the 20th century we witnessed two Beatles’ arrests for possession of hashish, an Olympian stripped of his Gold medal, and a grisly Mexican drug war. Voters became tired of the War on Drugs, and the new millennium brought a wave of populist-led legalization efforts.
Evaluating the success of these legalization efforts has been almost as divisive as legalization itself, with some claiming that the sky has fallen and others claiming only upside. Freedman understands something that few else can. The cannabis legalization experiment cannot be easily shoehorned into a simple narrative. He knows that its short-term successes and shortcomings do not definitively answer the “Should we legalize?” question. He knows that we can’t yet conclude whether legalization will be good or bad for society. Informed by his unique experience, Freedman’s conclusions are much richer than the doom-and-gloom pronouncements of prohibitionists or the panaceas presented by proponents. How you legalize matters. Getting legalization right matters. Alone among policy experts, Freedman is able to offer a nuanced evaluation of the history-making experiment – and how it will profoundly impact the world for generations to come.
Join Freedman as he provides a tempered view of what we currently know about the effects of legalization. Freedman will then lead a dialog about how best to engage your community on this divisive topic going forward.

References:

1. Lessons and approaches to engaging the community.

2. An agenda-free look at current data and how best to collect data going forward.

3. Preparing the public health community to engage in the future policies of legalization.

Learning Objectives: https://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJMp1500043; https://cdpsdocs.state.co.us/ors/docs/reports/2016-SB13-283-Rpt.pdf; https://ajph.aphapublications.org/doi/abs/10.2105/AJPH.2017.303848; https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1111/add.13886

Bio:

Andrew Freedman is Co-founder and Senior Director of Freedman & Koski, Inc. Andrew’s first-in-the-nation consulting firm works with government, research institutions, communities and private businesses to get cannabis legalization right. Andrew brings vast experience from his three years as the State of Colorado’s first Director of Marijuana Coordination. During this time, he developed distinctive experience effectively implementing voter-mandated legalized recreational and medical marijuana while protecting public health, maintaining public safety, and keeping marijuana out of the hands of children.

 

Dr. William Miller


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Dr. William R. Miller

September 7th 3:15 pm Main Ballroom Anvil Centre

Abstract:

Motivational Interviewing (MI) is a person-centered counseling method to strengthen autonomous motivation for change and mobilize internal resources. A large outcome literature indicates that MI often sparks a turning point in addiction careers. It has been a key element in screening and brief intervention, and appears to be of differential benefit with people from historically disempowered groups. Dr. Miller, the original developer of MI, will describe key components of MI and consider possible applications to build recovery capital including: (1) outreach with “low motivation” clients, (2) ongoing recovery check-ups, (3) individualizing recovery plans, (4) peer communication styles in mutual-help groups, (5) sampling of recovery-relevant resources and activities, (6) mobilizing family and social capital, and (7) exploring values and meaning in recovery. He will also address the importance of one’s underlying mindset and “heartset” in helping relationships

Learning Objectives:

1. Differentiate the four component processes of motivational interviewing.
2. Describe the client behaviors of “change talk” and “sustain talk” and give examples of each.
3. Identify at least three different ways in which motivational interviewing can be used in building recovery capital.

References:

DiClemente, C. C., Corno, C. M., Graydon, M. M., Wiprovnick, A. E., & Knoblach, D. J. (2017). Motivational interviewing, enhancement, and brief interventions over the last decade: A review of reviews of efficacy and effectiveness. Psychology of Addictive Behaviors, 31(8), 862-887.
Miller, W. R., & Rollnick, S. (2013). Motivational interviewing: Helping people change (3rd ed.). New York: Guilford Press.
Miller, W. R., & Moyers, T. B. (2017). Motivational interviewing and the clinical science of Carl Rogers. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 85(8), 757-766.
Moyers, T. B., Martin, T., Houck, J. M., Christopher, P. J., & Tonigan, J. S. (2009). From in-session behaviors to drinking outcomes: A causal chain for motivational interviewing. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 77(6), 1113-1124.
Moyers, T. B., & Miller, W. R. (2013). Is low therapist empathy toxic? Psychology of Addictive Behaviors, 27(3), 878-884.

Bio:

Dr. William R. Miller is Emeritus Distinguished Professor of Psychology and Psychiatry at the University of New Mexico where he served as Director of Clinical Training for the doctoral program in clinical psychology and as Co-Director of the Center on Alcoholism, Substance Abuse and Addictions (CASAA). Dr. Millers publications include over 50 books and 400 articles and chapters. Fundamentally interested in the psychology of change, he has focused in particular on the development, testing, and dissemination of behavioral treatments for addictions. With more than 40 years of experience in addiction research and treatment, he has served as principal investigator for numerous research grants and contracts, founded a private practice group, directed a large public treatment program, and served as a consultant to many organizations including the United States Senate, the World Health Organization, the National Academy of Sciences, and the National Institutes of Health. In recognition of his research contributions, Dr. Miller is a recipient of the international Jellinek Memorial Award, two career achievement awards from the American Psychological Association, and an Innovators in Combating Substance Abuse award from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. He maintains an active interest in the interface of spirituality and psychology. His books have been translated into 23 languages, and the Institute for Scientific Information has listed him as one of the world=s most cited scientists.

Recovery Capital Conference of Canada
September 6th and 7th, 2018

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Presenting sponsors and exhibitors
SUPPORTING sponsors and exhibitors 
additional exhibitors 
Together We Can Inner Visions Recovery Turning Point Recovery
John Volken Academy All Cleared Pardons Narcotics Anonymous
Western Addiction Forum Sunshine Coast Health Centre Chopra Health Centre
Keynote Speakers

An Integrated Treatment Model for Addiction and Trauma/PTSD

Dr. Michelle Pole

September 13th 10:50am- 12:30pm

Abstract:

In this presentation, participants will gain an understanding of two disorders that co-occur at high rates, addiction and trauma disorders. There will be some discussion of brain involvement in these disorders and where these brain diseases overlap. The discussion will focus upon the theories that explain the comorbidity between these disorders and the underlying research that supports each of these theories. Finally, evidence-based treatment approaches for these co-occurring disorders will be presented along with the supporting research for their use.

Objectives:

•Participants will be able to describe ways in which addiction and trauma are brain disorders.
•Participants will be able to report upon research results that supports the use of integrated treatment for these disorders.
•Participants will be able to describe CBT theory of PTSD

Recovery Capital Conference – Toronto 

September 13th and 14th, 2018

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 Recovery Capital Conference of Canada – Toronto Conference Centre

The Carlu
444 Yonge Street, 7th floor
Toronto ON M5B2H4

 

Bridging Addiction and Mental Health Recovery

Speaker: Mary  Bartram PhD

September 14th 10:50am-12:30pm Clipper Room

Abstract: Recovery has long been a key concept in both the addiction and mental health sectors. But does the concept of recovery in addictions mean the same thing as in the mental health field? Recovery in both sectors has its roots in the advocacy of people with lived experience and their families, and includes a focus on hope in the face of stigma, self-determination, transformation, and the many dimensions of life (such as adequate housing, meanginul activities and connections, and freedom from discrimination).

While there are differing opinions in the addiction field as to whether abstinence is in fact a necessary condition for recovery, cure is generally not thought to be necessary for mental health recovery. This presentation will explore the implications of these convergences and divergences for the development of a shared vision for addiction and mental health recovery

Learning Objectives:

1. To understand what the convergences between the recovery concept in the addiction and mental health sectors are, and how these convergences came about.
2. To understand where the recovery concept in the addiction and mental health sectors diverge, and why.
3. To explore – in both small and large group discussions – the implications of these convergences and divergences for the development of a shared vision for addiction and mental health recovery.

References: Davidson, L. & White, W. J (2007). The Concept of Recovery as an Organizing Principle for Integrating Mental Health and Addiction Services. Behav Health Serv Res (2007) 34: 109-120, https://doi.org/10.1007/s11414-007-9053-7
Mulvale, G. & Bartram, M. (2015). No More “Us” and “Them”: Integrating Recovery and Well-Being into a Conceptual Model for Mental Health Policy. Canadian Journal of Community Mental Health, 34:31-67, https://doi.org/10.7870/cjcmh-2015-010
McQuaid, R., Jesseman, R., & Rush, B.R. (in press). Examining Barriers as Risk Factors for Relapse: A Focus on the Canadian Treatment and Recovery System of Care. Canadian Journal on Addiction.
Jacobson, N., & Greenley, D. (2001). What Is Recovery? A Conceptual Model and Explication. Psychiatric Services, 52(4), 482–485. https://doi.org/10.1176/appi.ps.52.4.482

Bio:

Mary Bartram has extensive experience in mental health policy development with federal and territorial governments, indigenous organizations and NGOs, including as the Director, Mental Health Strategy with the Mental Health Commission of Canada. Mary has been working as an independent researcher and consulted since completing her PhD at the School of Public Policy and Administration at Carleton University in 2017. She is an RSW and holds an MSc in Family Therapy from Purdue University.

Mary’s doctoral researched focused on equity in access to psychotherapy in Canada, Australia and the UK, with a particular focus on financial barriers and how government structure shapes service system design. Her consulting work to date has focused on implementation of reforms to improve access to psychotherapy and mapping the connections between the substance use and mental health sectors. She is particularly interested on the role of human resources and metrics in ensuring meaningful implementation of the new $5billion federal transfer for mental health and addictions.

Recovery Capital Conference – Toronto 

September 13th and 14th, 2018

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 Recovery Capital Conference of Canada – Toronto Conference Centre

The Carlu
444 Yonge Street, 7th floor
Toronto ON M5B2H4

Addressing PTSD with Concurrent Substance Use Following Occupational Trauma

Dr. Hester Dunlap September 13th 1:30-3:00pm Clipper Room

Abstract:

It is common for PTSD and Substance Use Disorders to co-occur among individuals attending treatment for operational stress injuries. This presentation will discuss common presenting issues in the context of treatment following occupational trauma and the relationship between PTSD and Substance Use. The empirical literature examining recommended treatments for comorbid addiction and traumatic stress will be reviewed. Clinical considerations when addressing both in treatment will be discussed including stigma challenges specific to the respective conditions,  addressing safety, and optimizing relapse prevention.

Learning Objectives:

Participants will be able to:
1. Describe particular issues related to stigma for addiction and operational trauma
2. Identify key components in recommended treatments and integrated approaches for PTSD with co-occurring addiction
3. Name findings from the literature regarding safety and relapse prevention as well as practical considerations to optimize these

References:

American Psychiatric Association. (2017). Clinical Practice Guideline for the Treatment of Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) in Adults.

Back, S., Foa, E., Killeen, T., et al. (2014). Concurrent treatment of PTSD and substance use disorders using prolonged exposure (COPE): A treatment manual. Oxford University Press

Back, S., Killeen, T., Teer, A., et al. (2014). Substance use disorders and PTSD: An exploratory study of treatment preferences among military veterans. Addictive Behaviors, 39, 369–373.

Flanagan, J., Korte, K., Kileen, T. & Back, S. (2016). Concurrent Treatment of Substance Use and PTSD. Current Psychiatry Reports

Najavits, L. & Hien, D. (2013). Helping Vulnerable Populations: A Comprehensive Review of the Treatment Outcome Literature on Substance Use Disorder and PTSD. Journal of Clinical Psychology, 69, 433 – 479

D., Snead, A., Allan, N., et all (2017). Integrated, exposure-based treatment for PTSD and comorbid substance use disorders: Predictors of treatment dropout, Addictive Behaviors, 73, 30-35.

Lozano, B., Gros, D., Kileen, T, Jaconis, M. (2015). To Reduce or Abstain? Substance Use Goals in the Treatment of Veterans With Substance Use Disorders, American Journal on Addiction, 24, 578-581.

Kaysen, D., Schumm, J., Pedersen, E., Sein, R, et al. (2014). Cognitive Processing Therapy for veterans with comorbid PTSD and alcohol use disorders, Addictive Behaviors, 39, 420-427.

Killeen, T., Back, S., Brady, K. (2015). Implementation of integrated therapies for comorbid post-traumatic stress disorder and substance use disorders in community substance abuse treatment programs. Institute of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston.

Bio:

Dr. Dunlap is the Lead Psychologist in the Trauma and Psychological Injury Program at Bellwood Health Services. She provides residential treatment for Operational Stress Injuries among veterans and first responders. She is the former Clinic Head of the Work, Stress, and Health Program at the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health and has been providing assessment and treatment following occupational trauma for over 10 years. She has extensive experience working with stress related disorders including PTSD, depression, anxiety, substance use, and chronic pain.

Recovery Capital Conference – Toronto 

September 13th and 14th, 2018

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 Recovery Capital Conference of Canada – Toronto Conference Centre

New Guidelines for Alcohol Addiction for Youth (APA Strategy for Youth)

Arthur C. Evans Jr

September 14th  3:15pm-5:00pm Ballroom

Bio:

Policymaker, clinical/community psychologist, and health care innovator, Arthur C. Evans, Jr., Ph.D., is the CEO of the American Psychological Association.  He previously served for 12 years as Commissioner of Philadelphia’s Department of Behavioral Health and Intellectual disability Service.  The transformation of the Philadelphia service system has dramatically improved health care outcomes and saved millions of dollars that the city has reinvested in other community-based services.  Prior to this time, Dr. Evans developed a multi-disciplinary private practice in New Haven, Connecticut, where he also served in leadership positions in clinical administration and state government.

Dr. Evans has held faculty appointments at the University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine and the Yale University School of Medicine.

Recovery Capital Conference – Toronto 

September 13th and 14th, 2018

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 Recovery Capital Conference of Canada – Toronto Conference Centre

The Carlu
444 Yonge Street, 7th floor
Toronto ON M5B2H4

8 Tips for Leaders on How to deal with Mental Health in the Workplace

Christine Burych

September 14th 10:50am-12:30pm  Sky Room

Abstract:

New findings, new trends and new opportunities are shaping the leadership and business agenda for mental health in the workplace. These trends are gaining further traction as their impact on the workplace steadily increases. In 2013 the cost of mental health to the Canadian economy was estimated at $51 billion with 500,000 Canadians absent from work on any given week due to mental health issues, including stress and mental health disorders.

As an employer, what can you do to create an environment of success and support for your employees to minimize the stigma and long-term absenteeism that often result?

Objectives:

* increase your awareness of the impact that stigma has on leadership behaviours

* learn best practices on how to support and manage mental health issues in the workplace

* learn strategies on how to have a supportive and productive conversation when someone is struggling

Bio:

Christine Burych is a top tier leadership consultant and executive coach who enables leaders to create collaborative, productive and mentally healthy workplaces that everyone wants be part of. She has helped more than 8,000 senior leaders in 50 big name companies get past their blind spots, improve mental resilience and grow their leadership presence in the best possible ways.

Christine worked the rapidly expanding Porter Airlines to develop their employee commitment statement and roll out corporate social responsibility initiatives, multi-year leadership programs and crucially, an employee innovation strategy that gets ideas from the ground to executives. She helped Canada Post to shift their culture to a focus on psychological health and safety. She has also moved the needle for Jam3, PepsiCo, Bell Canada, Staples, Johnson & Johnson, Cochlear, Richardson and Gameloft.

The exceptional, impossible-to-miss results she consistently delivers are rooted in her diverse, twenty-five-year background. Christine started her working life as a front-line community mental health worker, advancing to Acting Vice President of Human Resources and Organizational Development at Canada’s largest teaching and research mental health facility. She has held senior positions in HR and OD, facilitated, taught, coached and led clients and families, community members, volunteers, employees and executives across various public and private sectors.

As a commitment to her leadership passion, Christine runs the Millennial Crusade, a pro-bono, year-long program to address the leadership gap for Gen Ys moving up faster than any other generation in the workplace. This grassroots movement supports over 200 members, including rising all-stars at North America’s largest companies.

Christine holds a master’s Degree in Human Resource Management and a BA in Psychology from York University. She is a Certified Professional Coach from the College of Executive Coaches in the US, is a certified mBIT coach (multiple brain integration techniques) and has completed certifications in various assessment tools.

Recovery Capital Conference – Toronto 

September 13th and 14th, 2018

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 Recovery Capital Conference of Canada – Toronto Conference Centre

Protecting Addicted Youth,

Angie Hamilton

September 13th 1:30-3:00pm Sky Room

Bio:

Angie Hamilton is a retired lawyer. She graduated from McGill University in 1984 with a Bachelor of Civil Law (B.C.L.) and a Bachelor of Laws (LL.B). After being called to the Ontario Bar in 1986 she practiced in the area of Tax and Estate Planning for 11 years at Goodman and Carr, LLP and then started her own practice in 1997. She retired from law in 2003 to devote more time to her family. She is a member or the National Board of MADD Canada and the Chair of MADD Canada’s Public Policy Committee. In 2016 Angie founded Families for Addiction Recovery (FAR) with other parents whose children have struggled with addiction from an early age. FAR is a Canadian registered charity.

Angie is also a member of the Community Dialogue Steering Committee established by Toronto Public Health as part of the Toronto Overdose Action Plan. The mandate of the committee is to develop a community dialogue process in Toronto on what a public health approach to drug policy should look like for Canada. Through lived experience with one of her son’s struggles with addiction, Angie has developed a passion for supporting other families struggling with addiction, compassion for those in active addiction and an immense respect for those living in recovery.

Recovery Capital Conference – Toronto 

September 13th and 14th, 2018

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Recovery Support in Education: Recovery High Schools and Collegiate Recovery

Kristen Harper

September 13th 1:30-3:00pm Sky Room

Abstract: Adolescent and emergent adults in recovery from substance use disorder are confronted with the challenge of protecting their new way of life everyday campuses. Peer influences, academic pressure, and family stressors can often be too much for young people who are in the process from recovering from addiction.

These recovery hostile environments can be a barrier to sustained recovery, often causing students to dropout or return to use within a very short period of time. Over the past thirty – five years, however, educators, therapists, peers, and families have come together to address this severe lack of services for youth seeking a supportive community of understanding. Recovery High Schools and Collegiate Recovery Programs provide developmentally appropriate safe and affirming environments that enable students to thrive in their educational and personal pursuits.

This interactive presentation will provide conference attendees with a fresh perspective on youth recovery supports in educational settings as well as demonstrate how these programs impact communities at large. Participants will also be given a step by step process for creating recovery schools or collegiate recovery programs in their local communities.

Objectives:

(1) Understand continuum of recovery care services in secondary and post secondary settings, (2) Discuss community impact of recovery support services in secondary schools and institutions of higher education, (3) Review observations, patterns, and trends from various model recovery high schools and collegiate recovery programs across the U.S. and how these programs are replicable.

References: (n.d.). Retrieved March 15th, 2018, from http://www.collegiaterecovery.org/
Finch, A. J., & Karakos, H. L. (2014). Substance Abuse Recovery and Schooling: The Role of Recovery High Schools and Collegiate Recovery Communities. Peabody Journal of Education, 89(2), 159-164.
Fisher, E. A. (2014). Recovery Supports for Young People: What Do Existing Supports Reveal About the Recovery Environment? Peabody Journal of Education, 89(2), 258-270.
Harris, K. S., Baker, A. K., Kimball, T. G., & Shumway, S. T. (2008). Achieving Systems-Based Sustained Recovery: A Comprehensive Model for Collegiate Recovery Communities. Journal of Groups in Addiction & Recovery, 2(2-4), 220-237.
Kelly, J. F. (2003). Self-help for substance-use disorders: history, effectiveness, knowledge gaps, and research opportunities. Clinical Psychology Review, 23(5), 639-663.
Moos, R. H. (2008). Active ingredients of substance use-focused self-help groups. Addiction, 103(3), 387-396.
Selected Papers of William L. White. (n.d.). Retrieved April 09, 2018, from http://www.williamwhitepapers.com/
Smock, S. A., Baker, A. K., Harris, K. S., & D’sauza, C. (2011). The Role of Social Support in Collegiate Recovery Communities: A Review of the Literature. Alcoholism Treatment Quarterly, 29(1), 35-44.
Transforming Youth Recovery 2017 Census and Definitions of Recovery Support in Higher Education (n.d.) retrieved March 30th, 2018, from https://www.transformingyouthrecovery.org/research/2017-census-and-definitions-for-recovery-support-in-higher-education/.

Bio:

Kristen K. Harper, M.Ed., is currently partnering with Transforming Youth Recovery (TYR) to bring high quality technical assistance to collegiate recovery programs who have received one of TYR’s highly sought-after Seeds of Hope and Bridging the Gap grants. Prior to joining the TYR team, she was the Executive Director of Recovery Communities of North Carolina; a nonprofit, recovery community organization, devoted the promotion of addiction recovery, wellness and citizenship through advocacy, education and support. In 2013-2017, Kristen had the great fortune to be the first, full-time Executive Director for the Association of Recovery Schools (ARS), where she assisted in the creation, sustainability and accreditation of recovery high schools across the country. As the Collegiate Recovery Community Replication Coordinator for Texas Tech University’s Center for the Study of Addiction and Recovery from 2011-2013, Kristen provided technical assistance to over 80 universities seeking to create and manage collegiate recovery programs in all regions of the country. Kristen also founded the Center for Addiction Recovery at Georgia Southern University in 2008 within the College of Public Health, where she also became involved with Recovery Africa, a nongovernmental organization who strives to create recovery supports to communities in Africa. Kristen has been to Ghana, West Africa several times to provide technical assistance to the emerging recovery community. Kristen was invited and joined the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services National Advisory Council (CSAT) in 2016. As a person living in long-term recovery, Kristen has dedicated her life to helping others access recovery support services, locally, nationally and internationally.

Recovery Capital Conference – Toronto 

September 13th and 14th, 2018

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 Recovery Capital Conference of Canada – Toronto Conference Centre

The Carlu
444 Yonge Street, 7th floor
Toronto ON M5B2H4